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How to spy on a Property with Karma?

When writing unit tests, SpyOn, is used to watch and manipulate a method call, potentially returning your own data. This is used to easily mock external component calls so that your unit test can focus on the class in question without worrying about complications or side affects from external dependencies. I found myself in a situation where I had a class and that class had a read only get() property. I was creating my own Angular service wrapper for the Dragula drag and drop library. I was exposing some drop and remove listeners get methods.

I wanted to control the results returned from that get method. This was not a situation where I could set the underlying value because there was no set method. But, spyOn would not work because a get() method is viewed as a property, not a method. The class code was conceptually like this:


export class MyClass {

constructor(private dragula: DragulaService){
}

get dropListener(){
return this.dragula.drop('myDragulaGroup');
}
}

My code was using Angular, so the DragulaService was injected into this component, and the dropListener was exposed via a get.

For the purposes of unit testing, I want complete control over that drop listener Observable. Thankfully, spyOnProperties would give me that control.

The unit test would be a bit like this:


it("Should spy on Observable", () =>
{
const myClassInstance = new MyClass();

let dropObserver: Observable<any>;
const dropObservable: Observable<any> = Observable.create( ( ObserverArg: Observer<any>) => {
dropObserver= ObserverArg;
}

mySpy = spyOnProperty(myClassInstance, 'dropListener', 'get').and.returnValue(dropObservable);

I'm gonna take a quick break to explain spyOnProperty. It takes three parameters:

  • Class: The class instance that contains the property you want to watch.
  • Property: The name of the property being watched.
  • Accessor: The Access Type of the method being watched, in this case get.

Note that we are storing the results of the spyOnProperty in the mySpy variable. This is optional when using spyOn, but for spyOnProperty it is required. The unit test could would continue:


const val = myClassInstance.dropListener;

All that line does is access the dropListener property inside the class, which should trigger the spy. Now we can test against the access:


expect(mySpy ).toHaveBeenCalled();
});

In a more advanced unit test, we could subscribe to the dropListener inside the test, and use dropObserver.next() to trigger the result handler in an async block.

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