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How do I set up a Proxy Server with Angular?

This is an excerpt from my Learn With series on Angular 7, which came out about a month ago. I wrote this up for the DotComIt newsletter, and thought I'd share it here too.

This post details how to use Angular's server side proxy to connect the Angular CLI dev server to access the NodeJS application server without having to worry about cross domain issues. The Angular CLI dev server is not set up to run normal server-side code, like custom NodeJS, ColdFusion, PHP, or Java. Instead the preferred approach is to set up a server-side proxy to redirect your Angular calls to your other remote servers.

The first step is to create a proxy config file. Name the file proxy.conf.js and put it in the root directory of the project, where the angular.json file is located. It should start as an empty file, but let's create a constant:


const PROXY_CONFIG = [{ }]
module.exports = PROXY_CONFIG;

The code also exports the configuration. The PROXY_CONFIG is an array of objects, although for our case we'll just have a single object. First, add a context:


context: [ "/nodejs" ],

The context value says "Whenever a URL comes in that contains `/nodejs`, we'll redirect it elsewhere. Exactly where you want to redirect it depends on your local configuration. Add a target property:


target: "http://127.0.0.1:8080/",

In the case of NodeJS, we're redirecting the request to a different port on localhost.

Set the secure to false:


secure: false,

In local dev environments I never set up HTTPS or use secure URLs like I would in a production environment. There are a few other values that may be needed or not depending on your local setup. I'll go over them here for completeness.

First, you can have the proxy to rewrite the path:


pathRewrite: { "^/nodejs": "" },

You'll only need a path rewrite if you need to modify the URL. For example, if your API will call '/nodejs/authenticate', but your actual service is set to '/authenticate', then this will allow you to direct your service call to the proper code.

Another value to be aware of is changeOrigin:


changeOrigin: true

You'll only need to use the changeOrigin value if you are setting up a local alias for your NodeJS sample. For example, if your NodeJS server is set to listen to requests on 'local.nodejs.learn-with.com' then this will tell the proxy it is okay to rewrite domain from localhost to 'local.nodejs.learn-with.com'.

The last value I want you to be aware of is the debug:


logLevel: "debug",

When you set this property, the console will give you a lot of details of how the proxy is working and rewriting URLs. It can be handy when you need to debug things.

Final Thoughts

I hope you're doing well in this holiday season.

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